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The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained on this website are for informational purposes only. The purpose of this website is to promote broad consumer understanding and knowledge of various health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

Asking for Help

Think of someone you know who is good at asking for help and expressing gratitude to others. This can be your model of how to do this difficult task with skill and confidence. How and when should you ask for help? Some will say NEVER! That’s not true, obviously. You can and should ask for help when you need it.

 

Choose someone who you feel comfortable with, who might even enjoy being of service in some way. When you receive help that you have asked for, how do you feel? Is it difficult for you to accept it or are you able to feel grateful? If you can feel grateful, that’s a positive emotion and it helps reduce your pain. Okay, it might take some practice.

 

If you need help frequently, then consider asking someone to visit you on a regular basis and include a social component, such as having a friend over for tea with the understanding that they would also give you a little bit of help with some tasks that you cannot do on your own. If you are always relying on a certain family member, or a child, make sure to express your gratitude and be watchful that you are not burning out your main supporter.